• How does NSS consult with employees on H&S Matters?National Services Scotland

    NSS has to consult with all your employees on health and safety. This does not need to be complicated and can be done by listening and talking to them about:

    • health and safety and the work they do
    • how risks are controlled
    • the best ways of providing information and training 

    In a very small business, you might choose to consult your workers directly.  Alternatively, you might consult through a health and safety representative, chosen by your employees or selected by a trade union.  As an employer, you cannot decide who the representative will be.

    Consultation is a two-way process, allowing staff to raise concerns and influence decisions on the management of health and safety.  Your employees are often the best people to understand risks in the workplace and involving them in making decisions shows them that you take their health and safety seriously.

  • What are the Boards duties in relation to PPE?National Services Scotland, Public Health Scotland

    The Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992 place duties on employees to take reasonable steps to ensure that the PPE provided is properly used. 

    The Regulations also place the following duties on employees. 

    • PPE must be worn and used in accordance with the instructions provided to them 
    • Employees must make sure that PPE is returned to the provided accommodation after use (unless the employee takes the PPE away from the workplace e.g. footwear or clothing). 
    • PPE should be returned to the appropriate storage unit (if applicable) after use, unless the employee takes their PPE home, for example footwear or clothing. 
    • PPE must be visually examined before use. 
    • Any loss or obvious defect must be immediately reported to their line manager. 
    • Employees must take reasonable care of any PPE provided to them and not carry out any maintenance unless trained and authorized. 

    If you feel that you work within an area which you feel requires additional PPE, please discuss this within your Line Manger and refer to your Business Unit Risk profile to see if this has been identified and what controls have been put in place for you. 

  • What types of body protection is available?National Services Scotland, Public Health Scotland

    Types of body protection include 

    • overalls, aprons and coveralls (protection against hazardous substances) 
    • clothing for hot, cold or bad weather 
    • clothing to protect against machinery 
    • high visibility (jackets, trousers and vests) 
    • harnesses 
    • life jackets. 

    Tasks where body protection may be required include 

    • working with hazardous substances 
    • working next to the highway or areas with moving transport and vehicles (e.g. construction sites) 
    • outdoor, forestry and ground maintenance work. 

    If you feel that you work within an area which you feel requires additional PPE, please discuss this within your Line Manger and refer to your Business Unit Risk profile to see if this has been identified and what controls have been put in place for you. 

     

  • What types of hand and arm protection is available?National Services Scotland, Public Health Scotland

    Hand and arm protection comes in a variety of forms. 

    • Gloves or gauntlets (leather, latex, nitrile, plastic coated, chain mail, etc). 
    • Wrist cuff armlets (e.g. used in glass cutting and handling). 

    Tasks where hand and arm protection may be required include 

    • manual handling of abrasive, sharp or pointed objects 
    • working with vibrating equipment such as pneumatic drills and chainsaws 
    • construction and outdoor work 
    • working with chemicals and hazardous substances such as body fluids 
    • working in hot or cold materials or temperatures. 

    In order to eliminate the risk of ill health through exposure to latex a number of organisations have phased out the use of latex gloves and replaced them with nitrile. 

    If you feel that you work within an area which you feel requires additional PPE, please discuss this within your Line Manger and refer to your Business Unit Risk profile to see if this has been identified and what controls have been put in place for you. 

  • What types of foot protection is available?Public Health Scotland, National Services Scotland

    There are a number of types of safety footwear. 

    • Safety boots or shoes, normally have steel toe caps but can have other safety features (e.g. steel mid soles, slip resistant soles, insulation against the heat and cold. 
    • Wellington boot can also have steel toe caps. 
    • Anti-static and conductive footwear, these protect against static electricity. 

    Tasks where foot protection may be required include 

    • construction 
    • demolition 
    • building repair 
    • manual handling where the risk of heavy objects falling on the feet 
    • working in extremely hot or cold environments 
    • working with chemicals and forestry. 

    Where there is a risk of slipping that cannot be avoided or controlled by other measures, attention must be given to slip resistant soles and replaced before the tread pattern is worn. 

    If you feel that you work within an area which you feel requires additional PPE, please discuss this within your Line Manger and refer to your Business Unit Risk profile to see if this has been identified and what controls have been put in place for you. 

     

  • Information, Instruction and Training on PPE usage – what’s the requirements?NHS Education for Scotland, Public Health Scotland
  • What are PHS duties in regards to Legionella?Public Health Scotland

    Under general health and safety law, as an employer or person in control of a premises (eg a landlord), you have health and safety duties and need to take suitable precautions to prevent or control the risk of exposure to legionella.  

    Carrying out a risk assessment is your responsibility and will help you to establish any potential risks and implement measures to either eliminate or control risks. You may be competent to carry out the assessment yourself but, if not, you should ask someone with the necessary skills to conduct a risk assessment. This can be done by someone from within your own organisation or from someone outside, eg an external consultant.  

     

    For further details, contact NSS Facilities Management.

  • Where can I find wither safety advice?NHS Education for Scotland